The Olive Harvest

Hebron, or Al-Khalil in Arabic, is the only city in the West Bank were settlers are in the center of the city, which has made of this place one with more tension in the area.

This year the season for the olive harvesting in Palestine began in the mid of October.

Jenin, in the north of Palestine, was one of the frist districts where they began harvesting the olives.

The kick-off of the olive harvesting in Jenin was done by a large group of Palestinian students and a group of Norwegian volunteers.

Download the Olive Harvest Report 2009.

This year’s harvest was weaker than years’ prior, and alongside the low level of rainfall and hot weather, Occupation policy was a key factor. The olive trees bear less fruit after farmers have been expelled from the land and are prohibited from plowing and maintaining it. Settlers, who light fires, bulldoze groves, and allow pollution from hilltop settlements to run down onto agricultural areas, also contribute to the debilitation.

The olive harvest in Palestine is an age‐old tradition that reaffirms Palestinian ties to the land and serves as a vital element of Palestinian economic, social and cultural life. Each year, however, the harvest becomes a bigger challenge for the farmers who face a tightening siege from the Wall, expanding settlements, settler attacks, and permit restrictions, all of which serve to force Palestinians from their land.

Introduction:

As has been the tradition for generations, the month of October signalled the beginning of the olive harvest for hundreds of Palestinian villages across the West Bank. Each year, the harvest becomes a bigger challenge for the farmers who face a tightening siege from the Wall, expanding settlements, settler attacks and permit restrictions, all of which serve to force Palestinians from their land.

x

Select (Ctrl+A) and Copy (Ctrl+C)